Ibrahim Niankara, Ph.D

Assistant Professor

Abu Dhabi Campus

+971 2 6133555

ibrahim.niankara@aau.ac.ae

Education

B.S., Economics with Quantitative Studies option, Oklahoma State University, Magna Cum Laude, 2007

M.S., Economics with a Graduate Minor is Statistics, Oklahoma State University, 2009

Ph.D., Economics, Oklahoma State University, December 2011

Research Interests

Applied Econometrics, Health Economics, International Economics, Applied Micro-economics, Statistics.

Selected Publications

  • Niankara I. (2019), “Scientific media dieting and youth awareness and expectations about the environmental issues of deforestation and species extinction in the Middle East and North America”, World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, (Forthcoming) 
  • Niankara I. (2019), “The relative influence of inter-generational co-residence on healthcare market and labor market outcomes in post affordable-care-act usa”, Global Business and Economics Review, (Forthcoming) 
  • Niankara I., Niankara A. (2019), “The Relative Influence of Generic Essential Drugs and Nursing Staff Supply Shortages on Primary Healthcare Access in Burkina Faso”, Int. J. Economics and Business Research, Vol. 18, No. 2, pp.129 - 154. (in press) 
  • Niankara I. and Hassan, I. H. (2019) “Data for the spatiotemporal analysis of US global banks' exposure to foreign counterparty risks”, Data in Brief, Vol. 25, August 2019, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2019.103964
  • Niankara I. and Traoret, R. I. (2019) “Formal education and the contemporaneous dynamics of literacy, labour market participation and poverty reduction in Burkina Faso”, Int. J. Education Economics and Development, Vol. 10, No. 2, pp.148–172. DOI10.1504/IJEED.2019.098679
  • Niankara, I. (2019). “Cross-national Data Sample on the Environmental Affection and Cognition of Adolescent Students of Varying Interests in Ecosystem Services and SustainabilityData in Brief, Vol. 22, February 2019, pp. 312-318,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2018.12.019
  • Niankara, I. (2019) “Gender inequality in literacy status and its effects on households economic well-being in Burkina Faso: a semi parametric bivariate sample selection modelling approach”, Int. J. Economics and Business Research, Vol. 17, No. 2, pp.218-242.  DOI10.1504/IJEBR.2019.097657
  • Niankara I. and Zoungrana, D. T. (2018) “Interest in the Biosphere and students environmental awareness and optimism: A global perspective”, Global Ecology and Conservation, Vol. 16, e00489, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2018.e00489
  • Niankara, I. (2018). “Modelling the effects of exposure to risk on junior faculty productivity incentives under the academic tenure system” African Journal of Science, Technology, Innovation and Development, Vol. 11 , No 3, pp. 313 - 322. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/20421338.2018.1527880
  • Niankara, I. (2018). “Pooled Cross-sectional Sample Data of the 2015, 2016, 2017 National Health Interview Surveys for studying the determinants of Health care market and Labor Market Outcomes in Post Affordable Care Act USA”. Data in Brief. Vol. 21, December2018, pp. 1526-1532, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2018.10.130
  • Thiombiano, N. and Niankara, I. (2018) “Sound pollution: a source of social health inequality for people living near fixed and intermittent sources of pollution in Burkina Faso”, Int. J. Behavioural and Healthcare Research, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp.120–135https://doi.org/10.1504/IJBHR.2018.091258
  • Niankara, I. (2018) “Organizational Management Culture and Employers’ Health Insurance Offering Strategies in the US: An Ubuntu Based Random Utility Modeling Approach”, Global Business and Economics ReviewVol. 20, No. 4, pp.503-520. DOI10.1504/GBER.2018.092767
  • Niankara, I. (2018). “Evaluating Health Consumers Preference stability through Joint Estimation of Revealed and Stated Health Insurance Preferences Data”, Int. J. Economics and Business Research, Vol. 15, No. 2, pp.236-256. https://doi.org/10.1504/IJEBR.2018.089689
  • Niankara, I. (2017). “A risk based random utility model for population based discrete choice analysis in health economics with applications in modeling patients’ choices among medical treatment plans”, Global Business & Economics Anthology (GBEA), ISSN: 1553-1392, Volume I, pp. 27-39. Available at https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2980040
  • Niankara, I. and Niankara A. (2017). “The contribution of Body Mass Index in the shared etiology of Diabetes, Hypertension and Hyperlipidaemia: A Semi-Parametric Trivariate Probit modeling Approach”, Journal of Clinical Medicine and Therapeutics, 2(1), 1-12. Available at  http://www.imedpub.com/articles/the-contribution-of-body-mass-index-in-theshared-etiology-of-diabetes-hypertensionand-hyperlipidaemia-a-semiparametrictrivariate-p.php?aid=18393
  • Niankara, I. (2016). “Modeling Health Insurance Enrollment Decisions in the U.S., Under Preferences Endogeneity: A Bayesian Multinomial Probit Approach”, Journal of Global Business and Trade 12(2), 1-14. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2977039
  • Niankara, I. (2009) “The Role of Bandwagon and Snob Effects in Student Demand for Binge Drinking in College”. Journal of Global Business and Trade, vol.5, No.2, pp. 65-78. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2979475

Conferences

  • 3rd International Conference on Organization and Management (ICOM-2017), Abu Dhabi, UAE (2017)
  • 12th World Congress on Health Economics (iHEA), Boston, Massachusetts, USA (2017)
  • 30th Business and Economics International Society Conference (B&ESI),  Abu Dhabi, UAE (2017)
  • Annual English Club meeting, New Dawn University ( U-auben), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso (2016)
  • 9th European Conference on Health Economics (ECHE), Zurich, Switzerland (2012)
  • Eastern Economic Association (EEA), 38th annual conference, Boston, MA (2012)

Teaching Courses

Statistics for Business Decision-Making, Principles of Microeconomics, Principles of Macroeconomics, Statistics & Research Methodology, Production and Operations Management, Business Ethics.

Memberships

International Health Economics Association

Article Full-text Available

The relative influence of digital media consumption on youth interests in ecosystem services, sustainability and science as a means for disease prevention : A global retrospective cross-sectional analysis

Published in: Interdisciplinary Working Papers

Jan 27, 2019

/ Ibrahim Niankara / Muhammadnoor Aladwan

Along with the advantages associated with access to information and fast communication, screen time from increased digital media consumption has recently been associated with adverse effects on youth well-being. To get a clearer picture of its value for global youth based sustainability initiatives, this study investigates the effects of increased digital media consumption on youth's interests in ecosystem services, sustainability and science as a means for disease prevention. We achieve this, using data on 187821 adolescent students from 50 countries worldwide. Methodologically, we rely on a mixed bivariate ordered probit representation of youth's joint interest in the biosphere (ecosystem services and sustainability) and science as a means for disease prevention, which we then estimate using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Methods. We found that each level increase in adolescent students' reported frequency of news blogs visit reduces by 21% (with 95% CI [-0.23; -0.19]) and 11% (with 95% CI [-0.12; -0.09]) respectively their interest in the biosphere and in science as a means for disease prevention. Similarly, each level increase in adolescent students' frequency of web-browsing on broad science is found to reduce by 34% (with 95% CI [-0.36; -0.32]) and 26% (with 95% CI [-0.28; -0.24]) respectively their interest in the biosphere and in science as a means for disease prevention. Although a level increase in youth's frequency of ecological website visits also reduces by 20% (with 95% CI [-0.36; -0.32]) their interest in the biosphere, it is found to increase however by 3% (with 95% CI [0.02; 0.05]) their interest science as a means for disease prevention. Our results highlight heterogeneous effects of digital media consumption on adolescents' interest in ecosystem services, sustainability, and science as a means for disease prevention.


Article Full-text Available

Nuclear electrical power technology and nuclear waste awareness and expectations in the United Arab Emirates youth population: What role does interest in ecosystem services play ?

Published in: Interdisciplinary Working Papers

Jan 27, 2019

/ Ibrahim Niankara

Relying on the United Arab Emirates (UAE) extract from the cross-national data sample on the environmental affection and cognition of adolescent students, and seemingly unrelated bivariate weighted ordered probit regression modeling, this study adopts a national perspective to investigate the determinants of adolescent students awareness and expectations about nuclear power technology and nuclear waste in the UAE. Identification of model parameters is achieved through maximum simulated likelihood estimation. The findings show that each level increase in UAE youth's interest in ecosystem services and sustainability raises their awareness of nuclear electrical power and nuclear waste by 13.5%, while reducing by 2.4% their level of optimism towards the technology. Furthermore, we find significant heterogeneity in youth awareness and expectations about nuclear power technology across the seven Emirates. Accounting for all other factors (including interest in ecosystem services), UAE youth awareness about nuclear electrical power technology appears to not significantly influence their expectations about the evolution of this technology for the next 20 years. Given that the UAE first nuclear power plant ``Barakah'' is scheduled to start operations end of 2019 beginning 2020, and the typical long life-span of nuclear wastes, our results provide important insights for developing sustainable nuclear energy policies and establishing a long-term nuclear energy program in the UAE.


Article Full-text Available

International trade and the convergence in youth technological awareness and expectations in the north American free trade block: The case of Genetically Modified Organisms and Nuclear Power Technologies

Published in: Interdisciplinary Working Papers

Jan 27, 2019

/ Ibrahim Niankara

Relying on the USA, Canada and Mexico extract from the cross-national data sample on the environmental affection and cognition of adolescent students (Niankara, 2019), along with seemingly unrelated bivariate weighted ordered probit regression modeling (Niankara and Zoungrana, 2018), this study reports on the convergence of technological awareness and expectations within the context of international trade. We achieve this by adopting a regional perspective in investigating the effects of affective, cognitive and situational factors on youth’s awareness and expectations about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and nuclear power technology (NPT) within the North American free trade block. Identification of model parameters is achieved using maximum simulated likelihood methods. The findings show that although it’s been over 20 years as of 2015 that USA, Canada, and Mexico ratified the north American free trade agreement (NAFTA), the diffusion of technology and information within the trade block has not succeeded in homogenizing awareness and expectations about GMOs and Nuclear power technology, as observed in the youth population across the three countries. Indeed, in relation to technological awareness, compared to youth from the USA, those from Canada show 15% (GMOs) and 7.1% (NPT) more awareness respectively; while those in Mexico are respectively 34.4% and 19.5% less aware about GMOs and NPT. With respect to technological expectations, compared to youth from the USA, those from Canada and Mexico are respectively 34.4% and 39.9% more optimistic about GMOs, while 15% and 49.7% more optimistic about NPT. Overall, youth within NAFTA country members are respectively 2.5% and 6.7% more optimistic about GMOs and NPT for every level increase in their awareness about the two technologies.


Article Full-text Available

On the Concept of Immigrants Health-Economic Integration in the United States: The role of English Language Proficiency

Published in: Interdisciplinary Working Papers

Jan 27, 2019

/ Ibrahim Niankara

This paper investigates the role of English language proficiency (ELP) as a measure of cultural integration on U.S. immigrant families’ economic integration, as measured by annual earnings, and health care market integration, as captured by annual medical care spending. Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation of a mixed bivariate ordered probit (MBOP) model of annual earnings and medical care spending is conducted using a nationally representative pooled cross-sectional sample data from three waves of the U.S. National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS). The results reveal that limited English proficiency is associated with lower marginal earnings propensities (-$44.83, -$50.66, and -$56.97), and higher marginal medical care spending propensities ($8.09, $6.09, and $4.32) for each of three decreasing levels of ELP. Furthermore, we find a small yet statistically significant positive 7.2% correlation between immigrant families’ annual earnings and medical care spending propensities in post-ACA-USA. Therefore investing to raise immigrants’ families ELP in the U.S. would not only contribute to more effective socio-economic integration, but also strengthen the U.S. workforce and economy for decades to come.